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InSilixa, Inc. has a multidisciplinary, highly motivated and highly technical team comprised of industry veterans with diverse backgrounds in semiconductors, biotechnology, medicine, and informatics. Founded in 2012, InSilixa is driven by the quest to revolutionize the value, power and speed of molecular diagnostics worldwide by leveraging its proprietary semiconductor-based CMOS biochip technology. Our recent developments are outlined below:
  • InSilixa Developing Drug-Resistance TB Test Showcasing Potential for Hundreds of Targets
    04/21/2016

    NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Sunnyvale, California-based firm InSilixa is developing an assay to test for hundreds of potential targets that confer drug resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Apr 18, 2016 | Madeleine Johnson

    GenomeWeb Premium

        The TB test is intended to showcase the firm’s core technology, which can perform highly multiplexed nucleic acid amplification and analysis of hundreds of targets simultaneously.  InSilixa received a two-year, $1.5 million Phase II Small Business Innovation and Research grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute in 2013. The company also received $224,764 in funding from the National Institutes of Health last month to develop a point-of-care test   for cancer-causing strains of human papillomavirus. In addition to a total of about $3 million in NIH funding overall, InSilixa has won $1.4 million in early seed funding and completed a $13 million Series A financing round in 2014. The firm is now seeking $35 million in Series B funding.

        InSilixa CEO Arjang Hassibi told GenomeWeb in an interview that the general area of focus for the firm’s technology is infectious diseases.  Specifically, the firm is exploring “applications in which you require an actionable test in a quick amount of time … a complex test looking at drug resistivity with different strains, where the level of multiplexing is beyond simple PCR platforms that are out  there.”  The InSilixa technology uses semi-conductor-based chips for solid-phase array-based detection as the amplification is happening. It’s not a microarray, but it overcomes a bottleneck other technologies encounter with the detection step of NAAT testing, Hassibi said.  “The problem of multiplex PCR has been you can always increase the level of multiplexing — the record for sequencing is up to a few thousand — so, you can create multiple amplifications, but the challenge is detecting them in parallel,” he said.  By using optical methods, with different colors and channels for detection, other technologies can multiplex to a certain level. But, Hassibi said, commercial multiplex panels often divide samples   and do multiple reactions to get the required number of targets.  InSilixa’s method instead uses multiplex PCR to amplify all the regions in which mutations exist in one reaction chamber, and then it uses a CMOS, or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor, chip to capture and detect during the reaction, and perform a melt curve analysis in  parallel.  The melt curve component is able to distinguish single-base pair changes and provides “the sensitivity of sequencing,” Hassibi said.  The firm’s first chip, the Hydra 1K, can examine 1,024 mutations in parallel, and the company envisions this technology will be unique in the white space between sequencing and individual PCR tests or small multiplex PCR panels.

        The TB test, which is being developed with undisclosed partners, is intended to showcase this technology, Hassibi said. The firm is aware that the TB testing market is commercially challenging, but believes this test could be impactful and potentially benefit from funding set aside for that infection.  “We decided to pick up TB about two and a half years ago,” Hassibi said, adding that he believes surmounting the challenge of massively multiplexed testing for TB will prove to the industry the value of the technology. “If we can show it, everybody will say, ‘Wow, OK, they can probably do other  stuff too.’  The TB genome does indeed provide a challenge. It is more than 60 percent GC rich, with mutations in many genes conferring resistance to any of about five different drugs used to treat   infection.  “We showed our preliminary data to NIH, and the grant that we have been working on for a while is looking at more than 120 mutations across 10 genes to be able to detect them all in one test. So, it’s a pretty comprehensive system,” he  said.  A dominant player in the molecular TB testing field is Cepheid. That firm has a test for TB strains resistant to the first-line drug rifampin which detects 20 mutations in a hemi-nested RT-PCR using five different nucleic acid hybridization probes. It is also developing two new tests that are anticipated to have improved specificity and measure dozens of  mutations.  However, when a mutant strain was recently found in Swaziland to have gone undetected by the Cepheid platform, the firm noted it would need to decide whether that target could be added to the tests already in development. The implication was that adding a new target to a multiplex PCR assay takes time and requires additional clinical validation.  InSilixa, on the other hand, can theoretically start with up to 500 or 1,000 mutations in its test and may be able to add or subtract them more  easily.  “We have the bandwidth to look at all known mutations, but after a while it becomes a diminishing return,” Hassibi said. “Our strategy in the case of TB and other panels that we have been developing is to go for the set of mutations which are confirmed and actionable, put it on the panel to get it through a regulatory process … but because we do have the bandwidth to increase it, it will be incremental efforts, adding a few to a few hundred in the  future.”  The addition of mutation targets within known resistance-conferring regions, such as rpoB,   for example, is “extremely easy if the region is within what we already have, because we’re not restricted by the multiplexing level,” Hassibi  said.

        The chip, meanwhile, is run on a platform, but the essence of the workflow is in the chip itself, Hassibi said. The system is also compact, about the size of a shoebox. “We don’t have any sophisticated optics or any instrumentation except what is needed to drive the cartridge — the detector, the electronics, the heater, and everything is integrated in the disposable chip.”  He added that the cost is “very competitive, and not all that expensive,” but he did not provide a specific price.  For the TB assay, initial results would come in about one hour, while 30 minutes to one hour more is needed for subsequent melt curve analysis to validate the  results.  InSilixa is also developing other tests for infectious diseases and is partnering with outside firms to allow them to develop their panels on the InSilixa  chip.  The in-house infectious disease tests “generally require looking at a panel of organisms for a large number of mutations,” Hassibi said. Some of these already exist, and “they have a high reimbursement rate … but there are things that the Cepheids of the world cannot address, and those are done with targeted sequencing or multiple tests in  parallel.”  Hassibi declined to provide too much detail on the assays in development, but noted that “one of the applications includes about 21 organisms and a handful of mutations, and is going to be used in the clinical setting, for near-patient applications, and be a one-hour test.”

        In terms of partners developing assays on the InSilixa chip, while declining to name them, Hassibi noted they are both large and small companies that require solutions to develop the next-generation of their assays.  “About two years ago, this [business model] sounded really crazy. People said why are you doing this, you should keep all the applications for yourself, these are very valuable, but in the last six months to a year it is completely different,” said  Hassibi.  There are so many potential panels out there for HIV, HPV, and different GI panels, he said. “These are not onesie, twosie tests, but these are all orphans currently; which platform is going to take that, who is going to be able to detect 30 or  40?  “I think we are one of the companies that does have a solution for that, and that’s our model,” he said. “When companies do have panels and they want to go after them, we are opening our chip platform for them to adopt  it.”  The ultimate product of this collaboration will be the InSilixa chip and technology, with some of these companies then packaging that into their own private-label instrument.  Hassibi noted that beyond networking the firm developed partnerships and “really saw some  traction” after informally presenting to multiple diagnostics companies at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in January.

    Now, InSilixa is rising to the challenge of addressing all of the partnership possibilities without getting distracted. “Startups generally die out of indigestion, not out of starvation,” Hassibi said.

  • InSilixa Inc. and DNA Software Inc. enter into agreement to develop state-of-the-art high-multiplex infectious disease panels for commercialization on InSilixa’s CMOS biochip platform
    03/10/2016

    Infectious disease molecular diagnostic (MDx) assays developed specifically for InSilixa’s sample-to-answer CMOS biochip platform will enable the rapid identification of pathogens and their drug resistance profiles in clinical samples using a highly multiplexed (>1000) molecular approach.

    Sunnyvale, CA – March 9th, 2016.  InSilixa Inc., the pioneer in the use of CMOS biochip technology for molecular diagnostics (MDx) and DNA Software Inc., a leader in DNA diagnostic design and analysis solutions, announces a joint agreement to develop Infectious disease assays specifically for InSilixa’s sample-to-answer CMOS biochip platform.

    InSilixa’s proprietary sample-to-answer CMOS biochip technology enables rapid detection, quantification, and genotyping of pathogens (viruses and bacteria) in clinical samples and the simultaneous identification of their drug resistance profiles using a highly-multiplexed targeted mutation detection technique. The first generation of InSilixa’s products will focus on infectious diseases MDx applications in near-patient and point-of-care (POC) settings, including the comprehensive analysis of seasonal respiratory infection outbreaks, rapid detection of MDR bacteria (“super bugs”) in urgent care settings and the detection, quantification and comprehensive drug resistance genotyping of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in blood samples from patients with HIV/AIDS. The multiplexed PCR designs provided by DNAS Software will leverage their algorithms for signature sequence identification, ThermoBLASTTM for scanning oligonucleotides against collections of genomic sequences, and their PCR design software. “We are very excited to work with Dr. SantaLucia and his industry leading team at DNA Software to realize the full potential of our unique platform” said Dr. Arjang Hassibi, CEO of InSilixa Inc. “The agreement between InSIlixa and DNAS is a tremendous complement of technologies that will result in multiplexed detection of a wide variety of pathogens with outstanding sensitivity and specificity” said Dr. John SantaLucia, CEO of DNA Software, Inc.

    About InSilixa Inc.

    InSilixa, Inc., headquartered in Sunnyvale, CA, is a multidisciplinary, highly motivated and highly technical team comprised of industry veterans with diverse backgrounds in semiconductors, biotechnology, medicine, and informatics. Founded in 2012, InSilixa is driven by the quest to revolutionize the value, power and speed of molecular diagnostics worldwide by leveraging its proprietary semiconductor-based CMOS biochip technology. To that end, the company is developing point-of-care (POC) and near-patient platforms for the delivery of low cost, high-performance, and mass-deployable solutions for DNA and protein-based diagnostic testing.

    About DNA Software Inc.

    DNA Software, Inc. is headquartered in Ann Arbor, MI and was co-founded in 2000 by Dr. John SantaLucia. DNAS has developed world-class expertise and algorithms for the modeling of nucleic acid folding thermodynamics, kinetics and structure. This expertise is applied to developing solutions to nucleic-acid diagnostics with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity, particularly for multiplexed assays. These solutions are fully automated, thereby greatly reducing the traditional trial and error approach. DNAS has accelerated ​the ​discovery ​timeline ​for their customers from months to minutes and in many cases provided solutions that were otherwise ​im​possible without the expertise of DNAS.

    For more information about the companies, technologies, products in development or partnering opportunities, please contact InSilixa Inc. at  info@insilixa.com or DNA Software Inc. at (734) 222-9080.

    See press coverage at GenomeWeb 

  • InSilixa collaboration highlighted in recent Dentistry Today article
    12/16/2015
    Dr. Jennifer Webster-Cyriaque is working with InSilixa Inc. to use the company's HYDRA-1K biochip platform to identify and quantify HPV in the oral cavity and estimate oral cancer risk.Biochip Identifies Oral Cancer Risks

    12 Nov 2015   Todays Dental News ©

    Jennifer Webster-Cyriaque is working with InSilixa Inc. to use the company’s HYDRA-1K biochip platform to identify and quantify HPV in the oral cavity and estimate oral cancer risk.  About 45,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year, according to the Oral Cancer Foundation, and only slightly more than half of them will still be alive 5 years from now.

    The low survival rate is due to the disease’s late diagnosis, which often doesn’t happen until it is in stage 3 or 4. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is causing a growing number of cases, so early detection of HPV in the oral cavity could save thousands of lives.

    Dr. Jennifer Webster-Cyriaque, a professor in the Department of Dental Ecology at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry and in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, is working with InSilixa Inc. to develop a rapid oral HPV test that could play a key role in timely diagnosis and treatment.

    “Right now, there isn’t a US Food and Drug Administration-approved test for oral HPV that’s available for point-of-care (POC) testing in the clinical setting,” said Webster-Cyriaque. “So the potential for this test is significant.”

    The partnership will use InSilixa’s disposable semiconductor-based biochip technology to adapt a test originally developed in Webster-Cyriaque’s lab so it can detect oral HPV when a patient comes in for care. Patients would swish or gargle a solution, and the clinician would take a sample. That sample would be added to a cartridge that includes the biochip.

    “It is really a DNA analysis instrument on a small chip. It uses 32×32 semiconductor-integrated and miniaturized biosensor arrays to detect unique DNA markers of HPV and its high-risk strains electronically,” said Webster-Cyriaque.

    The technology can identify hundreds of unique bio-molecule targets, including nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) and peptides, in parallel. By reading these biomarkers in the sample, the biochip can detect the presence of HPV in the oral cavity and then identify and quantify which one of the nearly 200 strains of HPV it is. Some strains present a greater cancer risk than others.

    To get the results, the clinician inserts the cartridge into a handheld reader that’s about the size of a large mobile phone. Within an hour, the reader provides a quantitative and qualitative patient report that the clinician would use to identify the strain as well as how much of it is present. Based on this information, the doctor can assess the risk for HPV-induced cancer.

    “Persistent, high-risk HPV is the single most important risk factor in progression to an oropharyngeal cancer,” said Webster-Cyriaque. “So if a person came in at point x, a high-risk type, and then came back again at point y, still a high-risk type, we may want to follow that person more closely. We may want to refer them to an oral surgeon or an ear, nose, and throat doctor.”

    About 79 million Americans currently have HPV, including 10% of men and 3.6% of women with oral HPV, with about 14 million new infections each year. It is the most common sexually transmitted infection, and nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. Most people with HPV-associated cancers are in their fifties, sixties, and seventies.

    “We know that many people have their initial exposure to HPV in their twenties, and many times, people clear the infection,” said Webster-Cyriaque. “Sometimes they don’t, and the virus is able to establish latency. The metrics describing the exact numbers in terms of what percentage of cases that establish latency move forward to become cancer don’t exist yet.”

    Despite the prevalence of HPV, this test might not become a standard procedure in routine trips to the dentist for cleanings and exams. For example, tobacco and alcohol use also are risk factors in oral cancer, but not all oral cancer patients smoke or drink. Webster-Cyriaque says more research and epidemiologic studies will help determine which risk factors will drive the criteria for administering the test.

    Still, the technology has promise. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded a $224,764 Phase I Small Business Innovation Research Grant to InSilixa to develop the rapid POC molecular diagnostics version of the test. The company also recently received an NIH grant to develop a lab-on-a-chip tuberculosis test. Furthermore, it is working on biochips that can detect upper respiratory infections, HIV viral load/drug resistance, and drug-resistant bacteria associated with hospital-acquired infections.

    “The PCR-based (polymerase chain reaction) test that serves as the basis for this POC assay has demonstrated significant specificity and sensitivity,” said Webster-Cyriaque. “This is a test that has been used in National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research sponsored clinical trials.”

    The researchers believe the test is a vast improvement over current detection methods, which rely on invasive and painful biopsies that often turn out to be negative anyway. The disposable chip also is much less expensive. And most importantly, it finds HPV long before lesions and other abnormalities form.

    “The one major issue that we have right now for oral cancer is that it is detected so late. The morbidity and mortality are very high, and that, of course, is associated with higher healthcare costs,” said Webster-Cyriaque. “So prevention or detection of an early lesion would likely save the insurance companies a good amount of money.”

     

    http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/todays-dental-news/item/529-biochip-identifies-oral-cancer-risks?

  • InSilixa Inc. receives a $224,764 NIH grant for the development of a rapid DNA-based, point-of-care (POC) oral human papilloma virus (HPV) diagnostic test
    08/19/2015

    Sample to answer CMOS biochip platform technology will enable the rapid identification and quantification of HPV types that cause head and neck cancers.

    Sunnyvale, CA – August 18, 2015 – InSilixa Inc., the pioneer in the use of CMOS biochip technology for molecular diagnostics (MDx), announces the award of a $224,764 Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the development of a point-of-care (POC) MDx test for the rapid detection and quantification of cancer-causing HPV types in oral samples.

    An emerging cancer threat. According to a recent report in the journal Nature, the number of head and neck cancers has been growing over the past 30 years: there are now 10,000 cases in the United States each year, a number that is likely to climb to 16,000 by 2030. An overwhelming majority are caused by HPV and globally it is believed that HPV is responsible for between 45% and 90% of head and neck cancers.  The incidence of these HPV associated cancers continues to grow, as the incidence of tobacco associated head and neck cancers declines.

    An unmet medical and public health need. The CDC estimates that 10% of men and 3.6% of women in the U.S. have an oral HPV infection. These numbers are even higher in the context of immune suppression.  However there is no FDA-approved screening test to diagnose HPV in the mouth or throat. “As detection of persistent HPV is among the strongest risk factors for HPV-associated head and neck cancers, the development of such a device would be invaluable”   said Professor Jennifer Webster-Cyriaque of the University of North Carolina, co-investigator on the InSilixa oral HPV detection project.

    InSilixa’s unique technology. InSilixa’s proprietary sample-to-answer CMOS biochip technology enables rapid detection and genotyping of pathogens (viruses and bacteria) in clinical samples and the simultaneous identification of their drug resistance profiles using a highly-multiplexed targeted DNA sequencing approach. The first generation of InSilixa’s products will focus on infectious diseases MDx applications in near-patient and POC settings, including the rapid detection of MDR bacteria (“super bugs”) in intensive care units, comprehensive analysis of seasonal respiratory infection outbreaks, diagnosis and drug resistance genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with TB, the detection, quantification and genotyping of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in  blood samples from patients with HIV/AIDS  and the detection and genotyping of cancer-causing viruses such as HPV. “We are very pleased that NIH continues to support development of the InSilixa platform, in this instance as a potential new tool to screen oral specimens such as saliva for cancer-causing HPV types and to risk-stratify those persons found to be positive ” said Dr. Gary Schoolnik, CMO. “The unique cost and performance of InSilixa’s CMOS biochips make it possible to create viable products in markets that historically have not been addressable by DNA sequencing technologies” said Dr. Arjang Hassibi, CEO of InSilixa Inc.  In this project, this unique InSilixa platform will be leveraged utilizing previously described HPV detection work by Seaman et al. in the Webster-Cyriaque group as a foundation.

    About InSilixa

    InSilixa, Inc., headquartered in Sunnyvale, CA, is a multidisciplinary, highly motivated and highly technical team comprised of industry veterans with diverse backgrounds in semiconductors, biotechnology, medicine, and informatics. Founded in 2012, InSilixa is driven by the quest to revolutionize the value, power and speed of molecular diagnostics worldwide by leveraging its proprietary semiconductor-based CMOS biochip technology. To that end, the company is developing point-of-care (PoC) and near-patient platforms for the delivery of low cost, high-performance, and mass-deployable solutions for DNA and protein-based diagnostic testing.

    The NIH grant described in this Press Release will be supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number R43 DE025441 (Hassibi, Arjang, P.I.). The content of this Press Release is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

    For more information about the company, technology, products in development or partnering opportunities, please contact info@insilixa.com.

  • InSilixa Awarded NIH Grant to Develop Point-of-Care Test for Drug-resistant Tuberculosis
    04/01/2015

    InSilixa announced yesterday that it has received a $1.5 million Phase II Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a point-of-care molecular diagnostic test for the rapid detection and profiling of antibiotic-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    The test will be based on InSilixa’s proprietary complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) biochip technology, which is designed to detect pathogens in clinical samples and simultaneously identify their drug-resistance profiles using highly multiplexed targeted DNA sequencing.

    According to the company, the test will check hundreds of known tuberculosis mutations and perform a comprehensive multi-drug resistance test for up to five key antibiotics in less than an hour.

    InSilixa is also developing the CMOS biochips for the detection of other multi-drug resistant bacteria and for the detection, quantification, and characterization of HIV in blood samples.

  • PointGuard Ventures and Morningside Invest $13M in InSilixa’s Semiconductor-Based Molecular Diagnostics Technology
    10/22/2014

    PointGuard Ventures a Silicon Valley venture capital firm, and Morningside, a privately-held investment group, announced today that they are leading a $13M financing round for InSilixa, Inc., a new Sunnyvale, California-based molecular diagnostic (MDx) platform developer. InSilixa also announced the appointment of Pete Thomas, Managing Director, PointGuard Ventures; and Dr. Gerald Chan, co-founder of Morningside, to InSilixa’s board.

    InSilixa is developing a new generation of high-performance MDx platforms leveraging integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing technologies, particularly complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. InSilixa’s fully integrated devices, such as CMOS biochips, are specifically designed to be cost-efficient, mass-deployable, and disposable; yet offer superior clinical performance, specificity, and parallelism. InSilixa point-of-care (PoC) systems, for example, can rapidly identify the infecting pathogen in clinical samples and simultaneously verify the absence or presence of genetic mutations that result in antibiotic resistance. There is an urgent need for such a system in multiple diagnostic scenarios, such as rapid detection of multi-drug resistant bacteria (“super bugs”) in intensive care units. The system is also critical for effective response to seasonal respiratory infection outbreaks and the optimal treatment of drug resistant bacterial or viral infections (e.g., tuberculosis or HIV) globally.

    The underlying technologies behind InSilixa’s products came out of Caltech, The University of Texas at Austin, and Stanford University. InSilixa exclusively licensed and combined them to create its unique platforms.

    “When we started the company, we were confident that we could make a superior solution using our CMOS Biochip technology to compete with today’s “big iron” instruments in the life science research market,” said Arjang Hassibi, Ph.D., InSilixa’s Founder and Chief Executive Officer. Yet, the real challenge for us was how we could leverage our technology to make a high-impact product for high-volume diagnostics and applied markets. I believe we have found the perfect answer, and we are pleased to have the support of PointGuard Ventures and Morningside to develop our envisioned products.”

    While precise details of InSilixa’s first products are not yet released, the company has indicated that the first generation of products will be focused on highly multiplexed genomic tests for PoC and near patient diagnosis of infectious diseases. Due in large part to the semiconductor technology underlying all its products, InSilixa is developing a platform-based architecture, which will allow the cost effective and rapid retargeting of its technology for use in different diagnostic applications, each employing different genomic target sets or panels.

    “InSilixa has created an art-of-the-possible tipping point by bringing the frontiers of DNA sequencing, molecular diagnostics, and personalized medicine to handheld field devices at global utility price points,” said Krish Panu, Managing Director, PointGuard Ventures. “This technology has the ability to make a tremendous and meaningful quality-of-life impact in areas such as infectious disease, dispassionate of geography and economic status. It is truly exciting for us to be funding InSilixa’s future developments.”

    “InSilixa’s focus on providing real-time, economical, mobile diagnostic capabilities could not come at a better time,” said Dr. Gerald Chan, co-founder of Morningside. “We look forward to progressing this personalized point-of-care technology.”

    About InSilixa, Inc. (www.insilixa.com)

    InSilixa, Inc., headquartered in Sunnyvale, CA, is a multidisciplinary, highly motivated and highly technical team comprised of industry veterans with diverse backgrounds in semiconductor, biotechnology, medicine, and informatics. Founded in 2012, InSilixa is driven by the quest to democratize and drive down the cost of molecular diagnostics worldwide by leveraging its proprietary semiconductor-based CMOS biochip technology. To that end, the company is developing point-of-care (PoC) and near patient platforms for the delivery of low cost, high-performance, and mass-deployable solutions for DNA and protein-based diagnostic testing.

    About PointGuard Ventures (www.pointguardventures.com)

    PointGuard Ventures, founded by Krish Panu and Pete Thomas, both Silicon Valley venture capitalist veterans with 35 years of venture and operating experience, invests in dynamic new technology companies to create new market opportunities or to solve problems in existing markets more cost effectively. Their venture experience spans over 50 startups, 12 IPOs, and many successful M&A transactions. PointGuard’s new fund will invest in software, networking, and hardware to provide “technology convergence” solutions to many of today’s markets including Mobile Commerce, Cloud Computing, Greentech, Point-of-Care medical, Education, and applied Data Analytics. PointGuard’s fund strategy is to invest in a mix of companies in need of Series A & B funding, and in select later stage investments that are based in the U.S. with the potential for early global market entry.

    About Morningside (www.morningside.com)

    Morningside is a diversified investment group founded in 1986 by the Chan family of Hong Kong. It is engaged primarily in private equity and venture capital investments. The group has investments in North America, Europe, and across Asia-Pacific, and since 1992, in Mainland China. Morningside is an active investor in early-stage life science companies formed around new technologies that represent a high degree of novelty over existing technologies.

  • InSilixa Inc., A winner in NOKIA Sensing XCHALLENGE
    10/04/2013

    We are proud to announce that InSilixa is the winner of a distinguished award at the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE!

    The Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE is a $2.25 million global competition to accelerate the availability of hardware sensors and software sensing technology that individuals use to access, understand, and improve their health and well-being. Innovation in sensing is an important component to creating a means for appealing, usable, smarter digital health solutions.

    InSilixa competed with 26 teams from seven countries who entered this competition. There were 12 finalist teams who demonstrated the sensing capabilities of their technologies to a judging panel comprised of thought leaders and industry experts who have cross-functional and relevant expertise in sensing and mobile health technologies. A percentage of the final score was crowdsourced via an attendee voting mechanism at the Health 2.0 Fall Conference in Silicon Valley, Calif. At the end InSilixa won the distinguished award for its HYDRA-1K technology platform which is capable of detecting DNA/RNA sequencing directly from clinical samples.

    About InSilixa, Inc.

    InSilixa, Inc., headquartered in Sunnyvale, CA, is a multidisciplinary, highly motivated and highly technical team comprised of industry veterans with diverse backgrounds in semiconductor, biotechnology, medicine, and informatics. Founded in 2012, InSilixa is driven by the quest to democratize and drive down the cost of molecular diagnostics worldwide by leveraging its proprietary semiconductor-based CMOS biochip technology. To that end, the company is developing point-of-care (PoC) and near patient platforms for the delivery of low cost, high-performance, and mass-deployable solutions for DNA and protein-based diagnostic testing.

    About XPRIZE

    XPRIZE is the leading organization solving the world’s Grand Challenges by creating and managing large-scale, high-profile, incentivized prize competitions in five Prize Groups: Learning; Exploration; Energy & Environment; Global Development; and Life Sciences. Active prizes include the $30 million Google Lunar XPRIZE, the $10 million Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE, the $2.25 million Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE and the $2 million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE.

    About Nokia

    Nokia is a global leader in mobile communications whose products have become an integral part of the lives of people around the world. Every day, more than 1.3 billion people use their Nokia to capture and share experiences, access information, find their way or simply to speak to one another. Nokia’s technological and design innovations have made its brand one of the most recognized in the world.